English Department Courses Fall 2018

FALL 2018

First-Year Eligible Courses

English 056:    Myth and the Hero: Homer’s Odyssey and Dante’s Inferno (4 credits, HU)       

(44037) MW 12:45-2:00            Professor Pavlock

This course will examine how myth is used to portray Odysseus (later known as Ulysses) as the greatest hero of intelligence and cunning.  We will begin by analyzing seminal myths of Homer’s Odyssey, such as the entrapment of Ares and Aphrodite, the song of the Sirens, and the ruse of the Trojan horse, and by considering the responses to these stories by characters within the narrative, including the hero himself.  We will then turn to the negative view of Odysseus in Sophocles’ tragedy Philoctetes, which questions the ethics of Odysseus as it takes up a myth mentioned in Homer’s Iliad about the absence of the wounded warrior Philoctetes.  Finally, we will explore how the late medieval poet Dante powerfully re-imagines this hero in the Inferno, where Ulysses, condemned to eternal punishment, tells the story of his final journey after he returned home from his wanderings following the Trojan War.  Cross-listed with Classics 56 (44031)

 

English 060:    Dramatic Action (4 credits, HU)       

(40111) TR 10:45am – 12:00pm           Professor Ripa

This course will examine how myth is used to portray Odysseus (later known as Ulysses) as the greatest hero of intelligence and cunning.  We will begin by analyzing seminal myths of Homer’s Odyssey, such as the entrapment of Ares and Aphrodite, the song of the Sirens, and the ruse of the Trojan horse, and by considering the responses to these stories by characters within the narrative, including the hero himself.  We will then turn to the negative view of Odysseus in Sophocles’ tragedy Philoctetes, which questions the ethics of Odysseus as it takes up a myth mentioned in Homer’s Iliad about the absence of the wounded warrior Philoctetes.  Finally, we will explore how the late medieval poet Dante powerfully re-imagines this hero in the Inferno, where Ulysses, condemned to eternal punishment, tells the story of his final journey after he returned home from his wanderings following the Trojan War.  Cross-listed with Theatre 060 (40318)\

 

English 096:    Poetry Matters (4 credits, HU)

(43109) TR 1:10-2:25                 Professor Fillman

This course will teach you why poetry matters in the 21st century – why it matters today, perhaps more than ever in a 24-hour virtual world of emoticons, internet memes, and streaming videos. How do poems enable us to protest injustice? How do they help us to build community? As we explore questions about poetry's place in the world, students will learn about several influential traditions in modern American poetry. In addition to class discussion, students will attend poetry events on campus and will be encouraged to craft their own original poetry.

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